Paper dress

For a brief time, it looked like the paper dress might be the long-term future of clothes manufacturing.

paper dresses art

One target group was children. At the height of demand, Mars Hosiery the makers behind Wastebasket Boutique was producingdresses a week.

How to make a paper princess dress

Paper dresses Share In the s, society fell in love with the idea of progress. In Scott Paper produced a simple disposable shift dress out of 'Dura-Weave', a cellulose material already used to make laundry-reducing garments for hospital workers. That is until high-street shops were able to compete by offering a quicker turnover of everyday fashions in materials that were cheap, relatively long lasting and far more wearable than cellulose. Advertising and consumerism was in its heyday and paper dresses were caught up in the marketing frenzy. Towards the end of the decade, hippy culture began to foster distaste for consumerist, throwaway ideas. Paper prom dresses was a huge trend in the late s. The political mood was shifting, too, encouraging people to fall out of love with the paper dress. In the US the Nixon presidential campaign commissioned a special design — the letters N-I-X-O-N in red, interspersed with blue stars — for female supporters to wear at rallies. One target group was children. The disposable nature of paper clothing was ideal for fast growing children. This appetite for novelty fuelled one of the decade's most frivolous fashion crazes: the paper dress. It was cool, colorful, and captured the consumerism culture.

Stylish and trendy men could purchase the novelty, brightly-colored vests, jumpers, bell-bottom pants, tunic shirts, and even full suits.

Young people with disposable incomes embraced the cult of the new, becoming keen consumers of fun, informal and fast-changing trends. Formal and Evening Wear Got the Paper Treatment The affordability of paper dresses made them ideal for one-time formal wear dresses.

By the end ofthe 'paper caper' garments that had been so popular only two years earlier had become yesterday's news. Commercialism extended into disposable fashion, too. The youth of the sixties were embracing modernism.

how to make a paper dress for barbie

The 'no sew' nature of paper dresses made them a good fit for female consumers keen to reject the 'Make Do and Mend' attitude of the previous generation.

Paper prom dresses was a huge trend in the late s. Plus the environmental awareness of the s ushered in a new way of viewing disposable, throw-away items, like paper dresses. In the first six months of offering paper dresses, the company sold more than half a million paper dresses.

Paper dress competition

Left to right: The Souper Dress, Paper prom dresses was a huge trend in the late s. Paper dresses could be altered in minutes with scissors and Sellotape: much more fun than spending a night in with your sewing basket. Advertising and consumerism was in its heyday and paper dresses were caught up in the marketing frenzy. The political mood was shifting, too, encouraging people to fall out of love with the paper dress. One target group was children. Brides-to-be could even purchase paper wedding gowns for their big day. You could color in your own paper dress to personalize it. Paper Dresses? They were the first true plastic generation and they grew up with a throw-away mindset. In the first six months of offering paper dresses, the company sold more than half a million paper dresses. They became a surprise sensation, with over half a million orders received in less than a year.
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PAPER PICCADO EYELET COTTON MIDI DRESS